Senna versus Schumacher finished; available Thursday 1 May

Yes, the Senna versus Schumacher story is now finished. I will re-read the entire story once or twice over the next few days and fix any mistakes or make minor changes where necessary.

Here’s the final excerpt from the story.

On lap 25, Senna was almost forty seconds ahead of second-placed Hill. On the Kemmel straight, Senna was nearing Schumacher, who was running eighth and over two minutes behind the leader. Coming out of the Rivage corner, turning left onto the short straight towards the fast left-hander Pouhon, Senna wanted to pass. He’ll move from the racing line to allow me through, Senna thought. But Schumacher thought: I’ll stay as far right as I can and lift off to let him past. So when no one expected it, Senna ran his Ferrari into the back of Schumacher’s McLaren. The McLaren veered right, without its rear wing, but continued. The Ferrari veered left, without its front wing and the right front wheel, but also continued. Both drivers made it to the pits.

Senna parked his car in the Ferrari pit box nose first. He threw his steering wheel out, got up, and stormed out of the pit box, pushing his mechanics aside.

Angrily taking off his helmet and balaclava, Senna stormed past the Williams and Benetton teams, and into the McLaren pit box.

A senior team member tried to stop him, but to no avail. The Brazilian, who had almost come to terms with the cheating allegations and the infamous crash of 1994, and their fierce battles and accidents a season later, was determined to obtain redress with Schumacher.

Ferrari team boss Jean Todt quickly got off the pit wall and hurried towards his driver. But he couldn’t stop the confrontation.

Senna versus Schumacher will be available on Thursday 1 May 2014.

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Wonderful film of the 1955 Belgian Grand Prix

Shell (re-)released a wonderful short film, during this 2013 Belgian Grand Prix weekend, about the 1955 running of the race. It features Juan Manuel Fangio and Stirling Moss in their dominant Mercedes’, as well Eugenio Castellotti in what would prove to be Scuderia Lancia’s last Grand Prix. The film provides an interesting insight into Grand Prix racing in the mid-1950s, and could very well serve as a prologue to our Ascari versus Fangio story.